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Eric.ed.gov – Important, but Not for Me: Parents and Students in Kansas and Missouri Talk about Math, Science and Technology Education

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: This study details parents’ and students’ current thinking about math, science and technology (MST) education and their satisfaction with the existing curriculum which most experts see as vastly below world-class standards. The study finds just 25% of Kansas/Missouri parents think their children should be studying more math and science; 70% think things “are fine as they are now.” The report also explains why parents and students are so complacent in this area and what kinds of changes might be helpful in building more interest in and support for more rigorous MST courses. The findings are based on a random survey of 1,472 parents and 1,295 middle and high school students in Kansas and Missouri, probing their attitudes on math, science, and to a lesser extent, technology education.… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Kansas

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Kansas cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. Kansas students have made real progress in math over the past decade, yet not enough students–least of all minorities–get the chance to learn challenging content that prepares them for college and careers. Students of color are least likely to be in schools that have the resources they need in math and science, and few eighth graders of any race or ethnicity have teachers with an undergraduate major in math or science. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – How Do Teachers from Alternative Pathways Contribute to the Teaching Workforce in Urban Areas? Evidence from Kansas City. Working Paper No. 243-0920

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: We examine how teachers from two alternative preparation programs–Teach for America (TFA) and Kansas City Teacher Residency (KCTR)–contribute to the teacher labor market in and around Kansas City, Missouri. We show that TFA and KCTR teachers are more likely than other teachers to work in charter schools, and more broadly, in schools with high concentrations of low-income, low-performing, and underrepresented minority (Black and Hispanic) students. TFA and KCTR teachers are themselves more racial/ethnically diverse than the larger local-area teaching workforce, but only KCTR teachers are more diverse than teachers in the same districts in which they work. In math in grades 4-8 we find sizeable, positive impacts of TFA and KCTR teachers on test-score growth relative to non-program teachers. We also estimate positive impacts on test-score growth… Continue Reading