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Eric.ed.gov – Examining the Validity of Behavioral Self-Regulation Tools in Predicting Preschoolers’ Academic Achievement

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: The current study investigated the predictive utility among teacher-rated, observed, and directly assessed behavioral self-regulation skills to academic achievement in preschoolers. Specifically, this study compared how a teacher report, the Child Behavior Rating Scale, an observer report, the Observed Child Engagement Scale, and a direct assessment, the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task, relate to early math and literacy skills. The sample consisted of 247 children from 31 preschool classrooms. Trained research assistants observed a subsample of 104 children. Results indicated significant, positive relationships for teacher-rated and directly assessed behavioral self-regulation for early math and literacy skills. Teacher ratings were the strongest predictors of literacy, and the direct assessment emerged as the strongest predictor of math. Observed behavioral self-regulation was not significantly related to either academic domain. Discussion focuses on domain… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – First-Grade Retention: Effects on Children’s Actual and Perceived Performance throughout Elementary Education

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: This study investigates the effects of repeating first grade on children’s further academic growth, by tracking the actual performance and the teacher-rated performance of a cohort of Flemish first-graders until the end of elementary school. Two research questions are raised: (1) How do first-grade repeaters, at the cost of one extra year of education, develop in comparison to younger children with whom they will eventually finish elementary school (i.e., same-grade comparison), taking into account their propensity of repeating first grade?; and (2) How would first-grade retainees have developed, had they been promoted to second grade instead (i.e., same-age comparison)? This study is part of the large-scale longitudinal SiBO project, designed to investigate Flemish children’s development and school trajectory throughout elementary education (Maes, Ghesquiere, Onghena, & Van Damme,… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Blueprint for Change in Georgia: State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2010

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: The 2009 “State Teacher Policy Yearbook” provided a comprehensive review of states’ policies that impact the teaching profession. As a companion to last year’s comprehensive state-by-state analysis, the 2010 edition provides each state with an individualized “Blueprint for Change,” building off last year’s “Yearbook” goals and recommendations. State teacher policy addresses a great many areas, including teacher preparation, certification, evaluation and compensation. With so many moving parts, it may be difficult for states to find a starting point on the road to reform. To this end, this paper provides a state-specific roadmap, organized in three main sections. Section 1 identifies policy concerns that need critical attention, the areas of highest priority for state policymakers. Section 2 outlines “low-hanging fruit,” policy changes that can be implemented in relatively… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Evaluation of the Waterford Early Math & Science Program for Kindergarten: First-Year Implementation in Five Urban Low-Income Schools

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Background: The Waterford Early Math & Science (WEMS) program is a comprehensive educational software program designed to build math and science skills and concepts in grades K-2, alone or to supplement existing curricula. The program’s capability to individualize lessons, assess and track student progress, and reteach lessons is aimed at keeping potentially “at risk” students at grade level. Purpose: The present evaluation of the Waterford Early Math & Science program is the first independent study of its effectiveness. Setting: The study was carried out in five low-income, largely Hispanic schools in the Tucson Unified School District during the 2005-06 school year. Study Sample: This report covers the 22 kindergartens (345 students) of a larger study of 59 K-2 classrooms (923 students) in the five schools. Intervention: Treatment… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Mathematics Awareness through Technology, Teamwork, Engagement, and Rigor

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: The purpose of this two-year observational study was to determine if the use of technology and intervention groups affected fourth-grade math scores. Specifically, the desire was to identify the percentage of students who met or exceeded grade-level standards on the state standardized test. This study indicated possible reasons that enhanced conceptual understanding within the study group at a Title I elementary school. Throughout the two-year time period, the classroom teachers created mathematics awareness through technology, teamwork, engagement and rigor. The findings revealed a significant percent of fourth-grade students who used technology and participated in specific learning activities met or exceeded grade-level standards in math as measured by the Washington State standardized test. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Cross-Country Evidence on Teacher Performance Pay. Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series. PEPG 10-11

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: The general-equilibrium effects of performance-related teacher pay include long-term incentive and teacher-sorting mechanisms that usually elude experimental studies but are captured in cross-country comparisons. Combining country-level performance-pay measures with rich PISA-2003 international achievement microdata, this paper estimates student-level international education production functions. The use of teacher salary adjustments for outstanding performance is significantly associated with math, science, and reading achievement across countries. Scores in countries with performance-related pay are about one quarter standard deviations higher. Results avoid bias from within-country selection and are robust to continental fixed effects and to controlling for non-performance-based forms of teacher salary adjustments. (Contains 7 tables, and 1 figure, and 18 footnotes.) Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Powerful Learning Conversations: Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Powerful Learning Conversations (PLC) sought to improve the feedback that teachers give to pupils in Year 9, by training them to apply techniques used in sports coaching. It is based on the idea that feedback in sports coaching is often provided immediately after a task is performed, and delivered in a way that children are more likely to respond positively to. The training programme adopted a ‘cascade’ model: expert teachers were trained in the approach and then expected to disseminate their training to English and Maths teachers in their school. PLC was developed in the UK secondary school context by the Youth Sport Trust (YST) in collaboration with the University of Exeter. This feasibility pilot study was conducted in 20 schools between January 2014 and November 2014.… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Teacher Perceptions of High School Students Underachievement in Science

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Low high school graduation rates continue to be a challenge in American public education. The pressure to meet the demands of adequate yearly progress (AYP) under the No Child Left behind Act of 2001 has led to an achievement gap in student performance between science and other core subjects, namely English, math, and social studies, on the Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT). GHSGT statistics have consistently reflected a lower science pass percentage compared with other core subjects on the test. The objective of this nonexperimental, quantitative study was to analyze teacher perceptions on reasons for student science underachievement on the GHSGT. A self-developed questionnaire based on Bloom’s taxonomy model was administered to 115 high school core subject teachers of a single school district. Analyses of variance… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – A Survey: Quality Practices. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 10.

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: This report summarizes findings from a national survey of 1,902 teachers of preschoolers regarding the extent to which they are able to engage in the educational practices they endorse. Teachers were given a list of 21 practices and asked to rate the extent to which each practice happened in their classroom and the extent to which they would want the practice to occur in a “perfect world.” Findings indicate few discrepancies between reported practices and beliefs. There were significant differences in the extent to which teachers from various types of programs endorsed group-centered beliefs, that is, those that encourage all children to engage in the same activities at the same time and at the same pace. Teachers in public schools, Head Start centers, and other non-profit centers… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Disparities between Schools in Japanese Compulsory Education: Analyses of a Cohort Using TIMSS 2007 and 2011

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Japanese compulsory education had been praised because of its equality around the early 80s. However, since the third wave-educational reform that began in the 1980s and still persists, it has been pointed out that there are disparities between schools in terms of students’ socioeconomic background and academic performance. Although there have been studies assessing relationships between students’ family background and academic ability between types of schools (e.g., private and public), how the disparities emerge between schools has not been investigated with nationally representative data collected in Japan. This study therefore attempts to empirically provide evidence of disparities between schools in elementary and lower secondary education by analyzing an age cohort at two points of time. Using fourth grade data from “The Trends in International Mathematics and Science… Continue Reading