0

Eric.ed.gov – Next Steps in K-12 Education: Examining Recent Efforts to Implement the Every Student Succeeds Act. Hearing before the Committee on Education and the Workforce, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourteenth Congress, Second Session (June 23, 2016). Serial Number 114-52

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: This document records testimony from a hearing held to examine recent efforts to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act. Member statements were presented by: (1) Honorable John Kline, Committee on Education and the Workforce; and (2) Honorable Robert C. Scott, Ranking Member, Committee on Education and the Workforce. Witness statements were presented by: (1) Daria Hall, Interim Vice President, Government Affairs and Communications, The Education Trust, Washington, D.C.; (2) Cassie Harrelson, Math Teacher, Aurora Public Schools, Aurora, Colorado; (3) Honorable John B. King, Secretary, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C.; (4) Dr. Stephen L. Pruitt, Commissioner of Education, Kentucky Department of Education; and (5) Dr. David R. Schuler, Superintendent, Township High School District 214, Arlington Heights, Illinois. Additional submissions were presented by Honorable Robert C. Scott, Ranking… Continue Reading

0

Eric.ed.gov – Building Capacity for Continuous Improvement of Math and Science Education in Rural Schools

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Schools in 47 high-poverty school districts located mostly along the Atlantic Coast of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia may have a head start on new requirements of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001, thanks to a $6 million grant from the National Science Foundation. Begun in April 2000, the five-year Coastal Rural Systemic Initiative (CRSI) is striving to stimulate sustainable systemic improvements in science and mathematics education in school districts with a long history of low student expectations, persistent poverty, low teacher pay, and high administrator turnover. The CRSI capacity-building model is designed to address issues in rural school districts that traditionally limit the capacity for creating sustainable improvements in math and science programs. A critical action step is that each school district… Continue Reading

0

Eric.ed.gov – The Power of the Pygmalion Effect: Teachers’ Expectations Strongly Predict College Completion

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: People do better when more is expected of them. In education circles, this is called the Pygmalion Effect. It has been demonstrated in study after study, and the results can sometimes be quite significant. In one research project, for instance, teacher expectations of a pre-schooler’s ability was a robust predictor of the child’s high school GPA. Raising student expectations has been in the news a lot recently as part of a larger conversation about improving learning outcomes. Most notably, a group of states have developed the Common Core State Standards, which go a long way toward establishing higher standards by setting out what students should know and be able to accomplish in reading and math. More than 40 states have adopted the standards so far. Recently, however,… Continue Reading

0

Eric.ed.gov – The Effect of Summer on Value-Added Assessments of Teacher and School Performance

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: This study examines the effects of including the summer period on value-added assessments (VAA) of teacher and school performance at the early grades. The results indicate that 40-62% of the variance in VAA estimates originates from the summer period, depending on the outcome (i.e., reading or math achievement gains). Furthermore, when summer is omitted from the VAA model, 51-61% of the teachers and 58-61% of the schools change performance quintiles, with many changing 2-3 quintiles. Extensive statistical controls for student background and classroom and school context reduce the summer effect, but 36-47% of the teachers and 42-49% of the schools are still in different quintiles. Furthermore, besides misclassifying teachers and schools, the results show that including summer tends to bias VAA estimates against schools with concentrated poverty.… Continue Reading

0

Eric.ed.gov – Addressing Teacher Shortages in Disadvantaged Schools: Lessons from Two Institute of Education Sciences Studies. NCEE Evaluation Brief. NCEE 2013-4018

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Schools serving low-income students struggle to attract effective teachers, particularly in science and math. In response to these staffing difficulties, states have tried to lower the barriers to becoming a teacher by establishing “alternative routes to certification.” These routes enable teachers to begin teaching before completing all the requirements for certification and, in many cases, require less education coursework than traditional teacher preparation routes in the same states. Currently, as many as two-fifths of new teachers enter the profession through alternative routes. Most programs providing alternative routes to certification admit most applicants, although a few, including Teach For America and the Teaching Fellows programs, are highly selective, admitting fewer than 15 percent of applicants. To provide evidence on the effectiveness of teachers from alternative routes to certification,… Continue Reading

0

Eric.ed.gov – Relative Achievement Effects of Four Early Elementary School Math Curricula. NCEE Evaluation Brief. NCEE 2009-4075

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Many U.S. children start school with weak math skills, and children from poor households lag behind those from affluent ones. These differences grow over time, resulting in substantial differences in math achievement by the time students reach grade 4. The federal Title I program provides financial assistance to schools with a high number or percentage of students from low-income households, to help all students meet state academic standards. Under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001, these schools must make adequate yearly progress in meeting state-specific targets for proficiency in math and reading, with the goal of ensuring that all students are proficient in math and reading by 2014. To provide educators with information that may contribute to making adequate yearly progress, this large-scale national… Continue Reading

0

Eric.ed.gov – Preparing Prekindergartners with Math Readiness Skills: The Effect of Children’s Talk, Focus, and Engagement on Math Achievement

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: The “Building Blocks PreK Math Curriculum” (Clements & Sarama, 2007) was designed to facilitate children’s engagement in math and talk about math. Much research investigates the effect of curriculum on classrooms or teacher practices. This study used a mediational model to look at a curriculum’s effect on children’s achievement gain, operating through specific child behaviors in the classroom. Specifically, this study looked at how a math curriculum affected children’s focus in math alone or in all learning activities (math, literacy, science, social-studies, and other), talking during math-related activities or in all learning activities, and engagement during math or during all learning activities. Additionally, this study examined how those child behaviors predicted children’s math achievement gain. It is hypothesized in the existing literature that much of the variability… Continue Reading

0

Eric.ed.gov – Changing the Developmental Trajectory in Early Math through a Two-Year Preschool Math Intervention

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: There is a national need for effective interventions to improve school readiness and subsequent achievement in mathematics for students from low-income families. The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate a 2-year preschool math intervention that began at preschool entry when children were 3 years of age and continued through the end of the pre-kindergarten (pre-K) year. Three principal objectives will be addressed in this presentation: (1) to evaluate the efficacy of a math curriculum for 3-year-olds implemented in the pre-pre-kindergarten (pre-pre-K) year of preschool; (2) to compare the impact of a 2-year math intervention (implemented during pre-pre-K and pre-K years) with a 1-year math intervention (PK) or a business-as-usual control condition on children’s mathematical knowledge at the end of preschool; and (3) to examine… Continue Reading

0

Eric.ed.gov – Teacher Quality Gaps and Student Outcomes: Assessing the Association between Teacher Assignments and Student Math Test Scores and High School Course Taking. Working Paper 185

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: We use panel data in Washington State to study the extent to which teacher assignments between fourth and eighth grade explain gaps between advantaged and disadvantaged students–as defined by underrepresented minority status (URM) and eligibility for free or reduced price lunch (FRL)–in their eighth grade math test scores and high school course taking. We find some significant gaps between advantaged and disadvantaged students in the value added of the teachers to which they are assigned in these grades, although gaps in middle school grades are sensitive to the specification of value added. We then show that teacher assignments are highly predictive of both eighth-grade test scores and advanced course taking in high school, and that differences between advantaged and disadvantaged students in teacher assignments explain significant portions… Continue Reading