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Eric.ed.gov – Implementing STEAM in the Early Childhood Classroom

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) education has received growing attention over the past decade, primarily within the middle and high school levels. This article focuses on the need for STEAM education at the early childhood level. Preschool children have a natural disposition toward science with their sense of curiosity and creativity. This ethnographic research involved professional development for 50 in-service preschool teachers in an urban high-needs area of the northeastern United States. The researcher explored how providing hands-on professional development, consistent support, and rich resources for STEAM lesson implementation into the early childhood curriculum would impact the dispositions, self-efficacy, and rate of implementation for teachers. The study also involved observation of the reception of STEAM instruction by preschool children. Data was collected through pre and… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Exploring the Use of Class Blog for PBL in K-12 STEM Subject

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: As students in elementary schools through Secondary Schools (K-12) have difficulty Learning Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) discipline, their numbers enrolling in these disciplines in higher education are also decreasing. So Researchers are looking for news styles in education including the use of Internet and Communication tools (ICT) to motivate students and enhance learning. Blogs are one of the ICT tools that could be used along with the use of Project Based Learning (PBL) in STEM discipline for that matter. But there are certain aspects that need to be explored for a successful blending of class blogs along with PBL in a STEM discipline in order to give students more engagement and motivation. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – STEM Education: Proceed with Caution

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: The STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) movement has developed from a non-educational rationale. Although some think it may enliven the delivery of maths and science in classrooms, the social and economic rationales are those that have initiated this movement. Spurred on by the global financial crisis, it is hoped that coordination and integration of STEM activities will better equip a workforce for dealing with the contemporary nature of business and industry, and encourage more school leavers to seek further training and employment in areas of engineering and science. The problem for educators here is that the consequent absence of a sound educational rationale for this combination of subjects inhibits its development. There needs to be a reason for integrating these subjects which relates to quality learning… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: North Dakota

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in North Dakota find the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. North Dakota’s students have made some progress in math over the past decade, yet not enough have the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. In contrast to most other states, North Dakota has also witnessed a decline in the numbers of computing degrees and certificates awarded in the state over the past 14 years. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: West Virginia

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in West Virginia cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. West Virginia students have made scant progress in math over the past decade, and too many lack opportunities to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. For example, students spend little time on elementary science, though eighth graders are more likely than their peers in other states to conduct hands-on investigations. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Connecticut

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Connecticut cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. Connecticut students have made little progress in math over the past decade, and not enough students–least of all minorities–get the chance to learn challenging content that prepares them for college and careers. The state faces some of the biggest racial and ethnic achievement gaps in the nation. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Colorado

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Colorado cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. The good news is that Colorado students have made real progress in math over the past decade. Yet not enough students have to the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers, and many students of color lack access to critical resources and materials in science Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Rhode Island

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Rhode Island cannot find the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. Rhode Island students have made real progress in math since 2003, yet not enough students–least of all minorities–have the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. There is special cause for concern in science: Girls lag behind boys, most 8th graders don’t have any teachers with a major in science, and science teachers say they don’t have the resources they need. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – International Education in the 21st Century: The Importance of Faculty in Developing Study Abroad Research Opportunities

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: This paper argues for a reimagining of education abroad that fuses short-term programming with some kind of experiential research component led by home campus disciplinary faculty, especially those in the sciences, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, in order to better integrate the study abroad program into the core undergraduate curriculum. To show how this could be done, this paper: (1) provides a brief background on study abroad; (2) reviews the relevant literature on the learning goals, program assessment, and faculty engagement in education abroad programs; (3) examines the current state of academic integration within study abroad; (4) explores the growth in undergraduate research at both home and overseas; and (5) identifies the unique opportunities represented in the extensive patterns of international faculty research collaborations, and explains… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Myths and Motives behind STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Education and the STEM-Worker Shortage Narrartive

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: The Business Roundtable (2013) website presents a common narrative in regard to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education, “American students are falling behind in math and science. Fewer and fewer students are pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and American students are performing at levels far below students in competitor nations on international standardized tests in these subjects.” (para.3) This message is echoed in numerous federal reports (e.g., NAP, 2005; 2010; PCAST, 2010:2012) and statements concerning STEM education from the United States’ (U.S.) President Barack Obama. The narrative posed by the Business Roundtable of a failing U.S. education system and STEM-worker shortage seems to be confirmed by businesses, nonprofits and the Obama administration, as they show their monetary and organizational support to remedy this… Continue Reading