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Eric.ed.gov – Teacher Training, Teacher Quality, and Student Achievement. Working Paper 3

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: We study the effects of various types of education and training on the ability of teachers to promote student achievement. Previous studies on the subject have been hampered by inadequate measures of teacher training and difficulties addressing the non-random selection of teachers to students and of teachers to training. We address these issues by estimating models that include detailed measures of pre-service and in-service training, a rich set of time-varying covariates, and student, teacher, and school fixed effects. Our results suggest that only two of the forms of teacher training we study influence productivity. First, content-focused teacher professional development is positively associated with productivity in middle and high school math. Second, more experienced teachers appear more effective in teaching elementary math and reading and middle school math.… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – The Gateway to the Profession: Assessing Teacher Preparation Programs Based on Student Achievement. Working Paper 65

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: With teacher quality repeatedly cited as the most important “schooling” factor influencing student achievement, there has been increased interest in examining the efficacy of teacher training programs. This paper presents research examining the variation between and impact that individual teacher training institutions in Washington state have on the effectiveness of teachers they train. Using administrative data linking teachers’ initial endorsements to student achievement on state reading and math tests, we find the majority of teacher training programs produce teachers who are no more or less effective than teachers who trained out-of-state. However, we do find a number of cases where there are statistically significant differences between estimates of training program effects for teachers who were credentialed at various in-state programs. These findings are robust to a variety… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Representing Rural Context in Doctoral-Level Math Education Courses: A Guide for Mathematics Education Professors. Occasional Paper No. 12

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: This short paper is designed to serve as a kind of primer for professors interested in thinking through ways to build a rural dimension into mathematics education courses in the interest of squarely addressing the vision and mission of ACCLAIM. Few words, therefore, will be deployed in the interest of establishing an intellectual warrant for the assumptions and assertions embedded in these pages. In fact, all that will be said in this regard is that 1) the ascendancy of what is loosely referred to as “constructivist learning theory” over the past decade clearly elevates the role of context in the development of human understanding. In other words, if professors want students (pre-school through doctoral level) to achieve at high levels, the insertion of context is currently seen… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Early Academic Outcomes for Students of Part-Time Faculty at Community Colleges: How and Why Does Instructors’ Employment Status Influence Student Success? CCRC Working Paper No. 112

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: More than half of community college courses are taught by part-time faculty, and the reliance on part-time faculty to teach developmental education courses and gateway math and English courses is even more prevalent. Drawing on data from six community colleges, this study estimates the effects of part-time faculty versus full-time faculty on students’ current and subsequent course outcomes in developmental and gateway courses, using course fixed effects and propensity score matching to minimize bias arising from student self-sorting across and within courses. While students with part-time instructors have better outcomes in their current course and similar pass rates in the next course in the sequence, they are 3 to 5 percentage points less likely to enroll in that subsequent course. The negative effects on subsequent enrollment are… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Axioms of Excellence: Kumon and the Russian School of Mathematics. White Paper No. 188

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: This paper looks at the popularity of after-school mathematics by focusing on the Kumon and Russian School of Mathematics models. In 1954, Toru Kumon, a high school math teacher in Japan, designed a series of math worksheets to help improve the test scores of his son Takeshi, a second grader. Toru’s goal was to teach Takeshi how to learn independently through the worksheets and improve his calculation skills prior to reaching high school. By working every day on the problems, Takeshi was able to reach the level of differential and integral calculus when he was just a few months into the sixth grade. The Kumon model is based on four elements: (1) Individualized instruction; (2) Self-learning; (3) Small-step worksheets; and (4) Kumon instructors. Parents who want to… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Reaching Further and Learning More? Evaluating Public Impact’s “Opportunity Culture” Initiative. Working Paper 181

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Public Impact’s “Opportunity Culture” (OC) initiative provides a suite of models aimed at extending the reach of highly effective teachers and has partnered with school districts to implement these interventions in schools. Using administrative data from three partner school districts that collectively include 44 OC schools, we estimate the relationship between OC staffing models and student achievement in math and reading. We find that the bulk of exposed students received treatment under OC’s multiclassroom leadership model, in which a master teacher with demonstrated effectiveness intensively leads and coaches a team of teachers, and that these students scored higher in math in all specifications. In reading, while most specifications find positive and significant learning gains for students taught by team teachers, the specification that performs best in our… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Can We Measure Classroom Supports for Social-Emotional Learning? Applying Value-Added Models to Student Surveys in the CORE Districts. Working Paper

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Teachers play a critical role in establishing classroom and school environments that contribute to students’ social and emotional development. This paper explores whether we can estimate a classroom-level measure of student growth in SEL by applying value-added models to students’ [social-emotional learning] SEL. We analyze data from the 2016 and 2017 administrations of student self-report surveys, which contain responses from roughly 40,000 students in Grade 5 within five of California’s CORE Districts. We estimate separate value-added models for each of the four SEL constructs assessed–growth mindset, self-efficacy, self-management, and social awareness–and for math and [English language arts] ELA academic growth. We find across-classroom-within-school variance of students’ SEL outcomes, even after accounting for school-level variance. The magnitude of classroom-level impacts on students’ growth in SEL appears similar to… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Understanding the STEM Pipeline. Working Paper 125

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: I investigate the determinants of high school completion and college attendance, the likelihood of taking science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) courses in the first year of college and the probability of earning a degree in a STEM field. The focus is on women and minorities, who tend to be underrepresented in STEM fields. Tracking four cohorts of students throughout Florida, I find that large differences in math achievement across racial lines exist as early as elementary school and persist through high school. These achievement differences lead to higher drop-out rates in high school and a reduced probability of attending college for black students. However, conditional on immediately attending a four-year college after high school, black and Hispanic students are more likely than whites to take STEM… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Role Model Effects of Female STEM Teachers and Doctors on Early 20th Century University Enrollment in California. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.10.16

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: What was the role of imperfect local information in the growth, gender gap, and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) major selection of early 20th century American universities? In order to examine pre-1950 American higher education, this study constructs four rich panel datasets covering most students, high school teachers, and doctors in the state of California between 1893 and 1946 using recently-digitized administrative and commercial directories. Students attending large California universities came from more than 600 California towns by 1910, with substantial geographic heterogeneity in female participation and STEM major selection. About 43 percent of university students in 1900 were women, and the number of women attending these universities increased by more than 500 percent between 1900 and 1940. Meanwhile, the number of California towns with female… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – What Makes Special Education Teachers Special? Teacher Training and Achievement of Students with Disabilities. Working Paper 49

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: This paper contributes importantly to the growing literature on the training of special education teachers and how it translates into classroom practice and student achievement. The authors examine the impact of pre-service preparation and in-service formal and informal training on the ability of teachers to promote academic achievement among students with disabilities. Using student-level longitudinal data from Florida over a five-year span the authors estimate “value-added” models of student achievement. There is little support for the efficacy of in-service professional development courses focusing on special education. However, teachers with advanced degrees are more effective in boosting the math achievement of students with disabilities than are those with only a baccalaureate degree. Also pre-service preparation in special education has statistically significant and quantitatively substantial effects on the ability… Continue Reading