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Eric.ed.gov – STEM Education: Proceed with Caution

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: The STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) movement has developed from a non-educational rationale. Although some think it may enliven the delivery of maths and science in classrooms, the social and economic rationales are those that have initiated this movement. Spurred on by the global financial crisis, it is hoped that coordination and integration of STEM activities will better equip a workforce for dealing with the contemporary nature of business and industry, and encourage more school leavers to seek further training and employment in areas of engineering and science. The problem for educators here is that the consequent absence of a sound educational rationale for this combination of subjects inhibits its development. There needs to be a reason for integrating these subjects which relates to quality learning… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: North Dakota

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in North Dakota find the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. North Dakota’s students have made some progress in math over the past decade, yet not enough have the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. In contrast to most other states, North Dakota has also witnessed a decline in the numbers of computing degrees and certificates awarded in the state over the past 14 years. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: West Virginia

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in West Virginia cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. West Virginia students have made scant progress in math over the past decade, and too many lack opportunities to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. For example, students spend little time on elementary science, though eighth graders are more likely than their peers in other states to conduct hands-on investigations. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Connecticut

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Connecticut cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. Connecticut students have made little progress in math over the past decade, and not enough students–least of all minorities–get the chance to learn challenging content that prepares them for college and careers. The state faces some of the biggest racial and ethnic achievement gaps in the nation. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Colorado

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Colorado cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. The good news is that Colorado students have made real progress in math over the past decade. Yet not enough students have to the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers, and many students of color lack access to critical resources and materials in science Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Rhode Island

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Rhode Island cannot find the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. Rhode Island students have made real progress in math since 2003, yet not enough students–least of all minorities–have the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. There is special cause for concern in science: Girls lag behind boys, most 8th graders don’t have any teachers with a major in science, and science teachers say they don’t have the resources they need. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Out before the Game Begins: Hispanic Leaders Talk about What’s Needed to Bring More Hispanic Youngsters into Science, Technology and Math Professions

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Hispanics are one of the largest and fastest-growing minority groups in the United States. Projections indicate a need for an increase of 20% of practicing engineers by 2010. Despite the growing number of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) careers in the American economy, education statistics suggest that too few Hispanic students are being encouraged and equipped to take advantage of opportunities in technical disciplines. American business and industry and the nation’s Hispanic communities would both benefit from addressing this mismatch. In summer 2007, the IBM International Foundation asked Public Agenda to interview Hispanic and Latino leaders in a variety of fields, asking for their views on what will be needed to bring more Hispanic students into the technical and scientific disciplines. This report is based on… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Maryland

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Maryland cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. The state’s students have made at least some progress in math over the past decade, and the state leads the nation in the share of students taking and passing AP tests. Even so, not enough students–least of all minorities–get the chance to learn rich and challenging content that prepares them for college and careers. What’s more, large achievement gaps separate students of color and their white peers, and students of color are least likely to be in schools that have the… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: South Dakota

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in South Dakota cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. South Dakota students have made no gains in math over the past decade, and not enough have the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. The state’s science teachers are more likely than peers in other states to have the resources they need, but elementary schools spend very little time on science. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Oklahoma

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Oklahoma cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. Students have made progress in math over the past decade, yet not enough students are exposed to challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. Science is an area of particular concern. Students spend little time on elementary science, few students conduct regular hands-on investigations and science teachers say they don’t have the resources they need. Link til kilde