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Eric.ed.gov – Transfer Incentives for High-Performing Teachers: Final Results from a Multisite Randomized Experiment. Executive Summary. NCEE 2014-4004

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: One way to improve struggling schools’ access to effective teachers is to use selective transfer incentives. Such incentives offer bonuses for the highest-performing teachers to move into schools serving the most disadvantaged students. In this report, we provide evidence from a randomized experiment that tested whether such a policy intervention can improve student test scores and other outcomes in low-achieving schools. The intervention, known to participants as the Talent Transfer Initiative (TTI), was implemented in 10 school districts in seven states. The highest-performing teachers in each district–those who ranked in roughly the top 20 percent within their subject and grade span in terms of raising student achievement year after year (an approach known as value added)–were identified. These teachers were offered $20,000, paid in installments over a… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: North Dakota

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in North Dakota find the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. North Dakota’s students have made some progress in math over the past decade, yet not enough have the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. In contrast to most other states, North Dakota has also witnessed a decline in the numbers of computing degrees and certificates awarded in the state over the past 14 years. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: West Virginia

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in West Virginia cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. West Virginia students have made scant progress in math over the past decade, and too many lack opportunities to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. For example, students spend little time on elementary science, though eighth graders are more likely than their peers in other states to conduct hands-on investigations. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Connecticut

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Connecticut cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. Connecticut students have made little progress in math over the past decade, and not enough students–least of all minorities–get the chance to learn challenging content that prepares them for college and careers. The state faces some of the biggest racial and ethnic achievement gaps in the nation. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Colorado

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Colorado cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. The good news is that Colorado students have made real progress in math over the past decade. Yet not enough students have to the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers, and many students of color lack access to critical resources and materials in science Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Rhode Island

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Rhode Island cannot find the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. Rhode Island students have made real progress in math since 2003, yet not enough students–least of all minorities–have the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. There is special cause for concern in science: Girls lag behind boys, most 8th graders don’t have any teachers with a major in science, and science teachers say they don’t have the resources they need. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Maryland

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Maryland cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. The state’s students have made at least some progress in math over the past decade, and the state leads the nation in the share of students taking and passing AP tests. Even so, not enough students–least of all minorities–get the chance to learn rich and challenging content that prepares them for college and careers. What’s more, large achievement gaps separate students of color and their white peers, and students of color are least likely to be in schools that have the… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Do More, Add More, Earn More: Teacher Salary Redesign Lessons from 10 First-Mover Districts

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: William Taylor, 29, a third generation Washington, D.C. resident stands out for a number of reasons. For one, he is an African American man who taught math at an elementary school for many years. Taylor excelled in the role, so much so that he now coaches his fellow math teachers at Aiton Elementary School, which is located in a high-poverty Washington D.C. neighborhood. He has also been profiled in the national news–specifically in “The Atlantic”–where it was noted that, in a typical school year, 60 percent of Taylor’s students start their first day in his class doing math below grade level, but by the end of the year, 90 percent of his students are performing above grade level. For his exemplary work Taylor earned $131,000 in 2013–another… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: South Dakota

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in South Dakota cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. South Dakota students have made no gains in math over the past decade, and not enough have the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. The state’s science teachers are more likely than peers in other states to have the resources they need, but elementary schools spend very little time on science. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Oklahoma

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Oklahoma cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. Students have made progress in math over the past decade, yet not enough students are exposed to challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. Science is an area of particular concern. Students spend little time on elementary science, few students conduct regular hands-on investigations and science teachers say they don’t have the resources they need. Link til kilde