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Eric.ed.gov – Do More, Add More, Earn More: Teacher Salary Redesign Lessons from 10 First-Mover Districts

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: William Taylor, 29, a third generation Washington, D.C. resident stands out for a number of reasons. For one, he is an African American man who taught math at an elementary school for many years. Taylor excelled in the role, so much so that he now coaches his fellow math teachers at Aiton Elementary School, which is located in a high-poverty Washington D.C. neighborhood. He has also been profiled in the national news–specifically in “The Atlantic”–where it was noted that, in a typical school year, 60 percent of Taylor’s students start their first day in his class doing math below grade level, but by the end of the year, 90 percent of his students are performing above grade level. For his exemplary work Taylor earned $131,000 in 2013–another… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Getting Ready for the Common Core State Standards: Experiences of CPS Teachers and Administrators Preparing for the New Standards. Research Report

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: The success of any education reform depends on many factors. A critical component is whether school staff are supportive of the initiative and view it as likely to improve educational outcomes. Equally important is whether school staff have the professional development opportunities they need to ensure their practice is aligned with the goals of the initiative. Chicago Public Schools (CPS) has been preparing to implement the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) since 2011-12. Teachers were expected to teach the new English and Language Arts (ELA) standards by 2013-14 and the new math standards one year later, in 2014-15. This report describes teachers’ and administrators’ experiences preparing for this transition, using survey responses from the spring of 2014 and the spring of 2015. Survey questions focused on four… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Impact of a Checklist on Principal-Teacher Feedback Conferences Following Classroom Observations. REL 2018-285

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Most states’ teacher evaluation systems have changed substantially in the past decade. New evaluation systems typically require school leaders to observe teachers’ classrooms two to three times a school year instead of once (Doherty & Jacobs, 2015). The feedback that school leaders provide to teachers after these observations is a key but understudied step in the teacher evaluation cycle. The feedback and subsequent professional development are intended to help teachers change their instructional practices and improve student achievement (Correnti & Rowan, 2007; DeNisi & Sonesh, 2011; Taylor & Tyler, 2012). However, little is known about the feedback that school leaders provide to teachers following classroom observations or about how to train leaders to make that feedback more effective. This study examined the impact of disseminating a detailed… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Learning That Lasts: Unpacking Variation in Teachers’ Effects on Students’ Long-Term Knowledge. Working Paper 104

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Measures of teachers’ “value added” to student achievement play an increasingly central role in k-12 teacher policy and practice, in part because they have been shown to predict teachers’ long-term impacts on students’ life outcomes. However, little research has examined variation in the long-term effects of teachers with similar value-added performance. In this study, we investigate variation in the persistence of teachers’ value-added effects on student achievement in New York City. We separate persistent effects into general effects that improve both the subject taught (math or English language arts (ELA)) and the other area of measured achievement and subject-specific effects which improve only the subject taught. Two findings emerge. First, a teacher’s value-added to ELA achievement has substantial crossover effects on long-term math performance. That is, having… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – “Of Being and Not Being:” Colombian Public Elementary School Teachers’ Oscillating Identities

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: This article presents the partial results of a larger study conducted in Bogotá (Colombia) with public elementary school teachers. Given their nature, and since they are equally affected not only by one, but by every policy of the Colombian educational system, the primary school teachers cannot be treated here as if they taught English only. They are responsible for teaching all subjects (math, social studies, physical education, English, Spanish, etc.). Data were collected through focus groups. Partial results show that the teachers’ identities range from feeling powerful to feeling powerless, depending on where they stand, that is, the field of knowledge, in the classroom, and in their relationship with the policies makers. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Retention, Attrition, and Mobility among Teachers and Administrators in West Virginia. REL 2016-161

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Members of the West Virginia School Leadership Research Alliance partnered with Regional Educational Laboratory Appalachia to study the average retention, attrition, and mobility rates among teachers and administrators in the West Virginia public school system. There is increasing evidence nationwide that low teacher and administrator retention rates adversely affect student academic outcomes, particularly in reading and math, which are reform priorities in many states (Béteille, Kalogrides, & Loeb, 2012; Branch, Hanushek, & Rivkin, 2012; Kane & Staiger, 2008; Ronfeldt, Lankford, Loeb, & Wyckoff, 2013). West Virginia policymakers and educators have thus expressed interest in increasing teacher and administrator retention rates to improve student achievement. This report provides descriptive information about retention, attrition, and mobility among teachers and administrators that can be used to inform policy and program… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Teacher Turnover in Maine: Analysis of Staffing Patterns from 2005-06 to 2016-17

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: There have long been anecdotal reports that some Maine districts have difficulty filling vacancies and retaining teachers. This is a common lament for schools in rural areas, and for schools across the state in hiring teachers for certain subject areas-namely math, science, special education, and foreign languages. Current policy initiatives in Maine such as the push for proficiency-based high school diplomas are raising the stakes for schools to employ high-quality teachers in all content areas. There is a concern that schools facing persistent teacher shortages may struggle to provide a comprehensive educational program, resulting in inequitable learning opportunities for their students. To further investigate the empirical evidence behind these anecdotal reports, the Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs commissioned this study of the Maine Education… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Financial Incentives to Promote Teacher Recruitment and Retention: An Analysis of the Florida Critical Teacher Shortage Program

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Staffing problems are pervasive in certain subject areas, such as secondary math and science and special education, where the combination of training requirements and relatively high alternative wages makes it difficult to attract and retain high-quality teachers. This project evaluated the impacts of the Florida Critical Teacher Shortage Program (FCTSP) and Teacher Recruitment and Retention Fund (TRRF) on the supply of new teachers and the retention of teachers in high-need areas such as special education, math, and science. The research: (1) addressed specific research questions pertaining to three programs (loan forgiveness, tuition reimbursement, and recruitment/retention bonuses); (2) investigated the causal effects of the programs; and (3) addressed questions related to the general characteristics of the program and participating teachers. The authors’ initial descriptive analysis indicated that FCTSP… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – The Need for More Teachers of Color

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: José Luis Vilson is a blogger, speaker, and math teacher in New York City, where he has taught for 10 years. Parts of this article are drawn from his book “This Is Not a Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education.” In this article he shares his concern for the lack of representation of black and Latino people, especially males, especially as teachers. He notes that while some work as principals and district administrators, others are third-party vendors, education lawyers, and professors in institutions of higher education. Effective (and ineffective) teachers often leave the classroom in favor of these occupations, further diminishing the numbers of male teachers of color in the classroom. While plenty of men do great work in administration, many use it as… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Listen to Us: Teacher Views and Voices

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Education policymakers and leaders often say that the opinions and observations of teachers are among the most important information to help explain and understand what is happening in schools. Teachers’ voices can inject a sense of classroom and school-level realism into those discussions and add clarity and credibility to issues that are often clouded by competing interests. The Center on Education Policy (CEP), in an effort to gather and amplify teachers’ voices about current education issues and their own profession, conducted a national survey of public school K-12 teachers in the winter of 2015-16. The survey focused on a strategic set of issues for policymakers, educators, business leaders, and the public, including teachers’ views on their profession, standards, testing, and evaluations. The nationally representative sample surveyed for… Continue Reading