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Eric.ed.gov – The Impact of High School Mathematics and Science Course Graduation Requirements: School Structural, Academic, and Social Organizational Factors

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Given the policy goals of course graduation requirements (CGRs), this study first tests the hypothesis that CGRs promote academic excellence and equity by both improving student performance (“productivity hypothesis”) and reducing the gap between student groups as defined by academic ability, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (“equality hypothesis”). This study also assesses whether and how schools differ in CGRs’ effects by testing the following hypotheses that CGRs affect student outcomes more positively in schools with (1) higher concentration of advantaged peers (“school structure hypothesis”), (2) greater academic/instructional capacity (“academic organization hypothesis”), and (3) stronger academic norms/climate (“social organization hypothesis”). This study analyzes the data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) that provide the information on high school CGRs in several academic subjects at the school… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: North Dakota

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in North Dakota find the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. North Dakota’s students have made some progress in math over the past decade, yet not enough have the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. In contrast to most other states, North Dakota has also witnessed a decline in the numbers of computing degrees and certificates awarded in the state over the past 14 years. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: West Virginia

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in West Virginia cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. West Virginia students have made scant progress in math over the past decade, and too many lack opportunities to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. For example, students spend little time on elementary science, though eighth graders are more likely than their peers in other states to conduct hands-on investigations. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Connecticut

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Connecticut cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. Connecticut students have made little progress in math over the past decade, and not enough students–least of all minorities–get the chance to learn challenging content that prepares them for college and careers. The state faces some of the biggest racial and ethnic achievement gaps in the nation. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Colorado

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Colorado cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. The good news is that Colorado students have made real progress in math over the past decade. Yet not enough students have to the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers, and many students of color lack access to critical resources and materials in science Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Rhode Island

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Rhode Island cannot find the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. Rhode Island students have made real progress in math since 2003, yet not enough students–least of all minorities–have the chance to learn challenging content to prepare them for college and careers. There is special cause for concern in science: Girls lag behind boys, most 8th graders don’t have any teachers with a major in science, and science teachers say they don’t have the resources they need. Link til kilde

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Eric.ed.gov – Perspectives on Algebra I Tutoring Experiences with Students with Learning Disabilities

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: The researchers conducted a qualitative analysis of the perceptions of school personnel and pre-service teachers about an Algebra I tutoring program for students with learning disabilities. The researchers surveyed and interviewed the participants about the effectiveness of the program for the mathematics learning of the students with LD at the school and as a learning experience for the pre-service teachers. The school personnel indicated there was a mutually beneficial relationship between the tutors and the school. The perceptions of the tutors revealed considerations about the challenges they face as Algebra I tutors of students with learning disabilities including remembering Algebra I content, posing strategic questions to students, dealing with students’ math anxiety, and conveying Algebra I content accessibly. The tutors reported positive experiences in the program including… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – The Implementation and Effects of the Mathematics Design Collaborative (MDC): Early Findings from Kentucky Ninth-Grade Algebra 1 Courses. CRESST Report 845

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: With support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, researchers and experts in mathematics education developed the Mathematics Design Collaborative (MDC) as a strategy to support the transition to Common Core State Standards in math. MDC provides short formative assessment lessons known as Classroom Challenges for use in middle and high school math classrooms. UCLA CRESST’s study of ninth-grade Algebra 1 classrooms in Kentucky implementing MDC showed strong support from teachers for the intervention and a statistically significant positive impact on student scores on the PLAN Algebra assessment, as compared to similar students statewide in Kentucky. The following are appended: (1) MDC Instruments and Rubrics, (2) MDC Teacher Log Descriptives; (3) MDC Teacher Survey Descriptives; (4) Analysis of MDC Student Work Artifacts; and (5) Quasi-Experimental Analysis of… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – Vital Signs: Maryland

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: Business leaders in Maryland cannot find the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent they need to stay competitive. Students’ lagging performance in K-12 is a critical reason why. The good news is that the nation’s most effective STEM education programs can help turn the tide. The state’s students have made at least some progress in math over the past decade, and the state leads the nation in the share of students taking and passing AP tests. Even so, not enough students–least of all minorities–get the chance to learn rich and challenging content that prepares them for college and careers. What’s more, large achievement gaps separate students of color and their white peers, and students of color are least likely to be in schools that have the… Continue Reading

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Eric.ed.gov – The Oregon Applied Academics Project: Final Report

eric.ed.gov har udgivet: This report contains the findings of the Oregon Applied Academics research and development project which spanned three academic years from 2010 through 2013. The overall purpose of the project was to develop and implement a technical math course that would meet graduation requirements and improve student performance. The State of Oregon has been actively engaged in the promotion of Career and Technical Education (CTE) curriculum integration over the past decade. The genesis of the Oregon Applied Academics Project began in 2006, with an initial implementation of the Math-in-CTE model with teachers from Lane County Educational Service District. The Math-in-CTE model was developed and tested as an intervention for CTE teachers. As partners in the professional development (PD) sessions, the math teachers learned new, authentic applications of mathematics.… Continue Reading